THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUTH:

All truth passes through three stages.
First, it is ridiculed.
Second, it is violently opposed.
Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.



Sunday, September 15, 2013

‘BATTLE OF THE BANDS’ #4 (Or, ‘BROADWAY HAIR VS. HOLLYWOOD HAIR’)

.
Republican Vs. Democrat, Male Vs. Female, War Vs. Peace, Light Vs. Dark, Good Vs. Evil, Man Vs. Machine, Love Vs. Hate, Dog Vs. Cat, Sun Vs. Moon, Brain Vs. Brawn, Oscar Vs. Grammy, Angel Vs. Demon, Laurel Vs. Hardy, Beer Vs. Wine, TV Vs. Radio, Pitcher Vs. Batter, Paper Vs. Plastic, Reality Vs. Fantasy, Yeshua Vs. Beelzebub, Conservative Vs. Liberal, You Vs. Me, House Vs. Senate, Offense Vs. Defense, Kramer Vs. Kramer, Spy Vs. Spy, Fischer Vs. Spassky, W.C. Fields Vs. Sobriety, Harold Gimpy, Jr. Vs. Sheldon J. Pismire, Rock Vs. Paper Vs. Scissors, Islam Vs. Everything, Singer Vs. Singer, Band Vs. Band...
. 
THE  BATTLE  OF  THE  BANDS!
.
.
Shoop-Shooby –
Shooby-duh-Dooby-Doop-Dooby-Dooby-Doo-Wah –
Buh-Doo-Wah!

Yes, it’s time once again for ‘Battle Of The Bands’ (BOTB). 
.
EUGENE  MARTONE  VS.  JACK  BUTLER
.
Some of us have a "special treat" for ya (or "special aural-aggravation", Sheboyganboy Six). The three of us who are counting votes for the BOTB compact disc award, agreed beforehand to adhere to a particular theme in BOTB #4. So, you better get yer Psychedelic on!
.
In 1968, the controversial Broadway musical ‘HAIR’ became a national sensation. Controversial? Did you not hear about the full-frontal male nudity?

I can no longer recall how I learned about ‘HAIR’, and it’s now astounding to me that my parents actually purchased the Broadway musical soundtrack for me on Licorice Pizza (LP). Apparently they were not aware that some lyrics referred to sodomy and fellatio. And I was too young (circa 1970) to know what those words meant.

It now seems that almost EVERYONE owned that Broadway musical soundtrack album back then. (I still remember being a paperboy and collecting from a client, and while waiting for him/her [don’t ask, ‘cause I won’t tell!] to return to the front door with my “Two Dollars!”, I noticed the famous green and red cover of the album stacked against a wall in the living room.)

Man, I played the hell outta HAIR! And way back then, as a pre-teen, I was popular for being able to recite the lyrics to the song ‘Colored Spade’. Not because my friends were anti-Black racists (they WEREN'T!), but just because they thought the words were funny (and they still kinda are). 
.
GODZILLA  VS.  KING  KONG
.
When I got older and began attending parties, I started to notice that every host with the most, or hostess with the mostest, all had the Broadway soundtrack to ‘HAIR’ in their record collections. It made me feel kinda with ‘The “In” Crowd’.

In the Comment Section of my blog bit titled SINGING AMERICAN REVOLUTION, I explained how the group The 5TH Dimension stumbled upon their biggest #1 Billboard hit song ‘Aquarius’, from the Broadway play ‘Hair’. Although I LOVE The 5TH Dimension, this blog bit is not about them nor the song ‘Aquarius’.

Included on the Broadway play soundtrack for ‘HAIR’ is the song ‘EASY TO BE HARD’, sung by Lynn Kellogg. Let’s listen to it:


.
ANDY  WARHOL'S  'STEPHEN  J.  McDANIELS'
.
In 1979, eleven years later (it went “Up To Eleven!”), ‘HAIR’ was released as a major Hollywood motion picture directed by Milos Forman. The movie featured Treat Williams as ‘George Berger’ and John Savage as ‘Claude Bukowski’. In the Hollywood version, it was Cheryl Barnes who sang the song ‘EASY TO BE HARD’.

Listen to the later cover and then vote, in my Comment Section, for the version you prefer: Broadway (Lynn Kellogg) Vs. Hollywood (Cheryl Barnes)...


.
I welcome EVERYONE – whether I know you or not -  to vote for your favorite of these two songs in the comment section below. And feel free to tell us WHY you chose one song over the other. (NOTE: Comment Moderation is activated. All submitted comments that do not transgress "Ye Olde Comment Policy" will be posted as soon as possible. Thanks for taking the time to comment.)
.
After voting here, I suggest - actually I insist - you pop over to FAE’s ‘Far Away Series’ and Arlee Bird’s ‘Tossing It Out’ blogs to see which songs they have chosen and vote there also. (If their BOTB blog bits aren’t posted yet, pour yourself two shots of ‘Grand Marnier’ over ice – do it twice – and then return to ‘Far Away Series’ and ‘Tossing It Out’ to vice your voice ...vote your vice ...voice your vote.)

Voice Your Vote @ ‘FAR AWAY SERIES’ by clicking HERE.
Voice Your Vote @ ‘TOSSING IT OUT’ by clicking HERE.
.
RIDDLER  VS.  BATMAN
.
Find The True Meaning Of Christmas: Win Money!-Money!-Money! Spectacular, Super-Colossal Neighborhood Christmas Lights And Display Contest!

Find The True Purpose For Voting On ‘Battle Of The Bands’ Installments: Win Compact Discs!-Compact Discs!-Compact Discs! Spectacular, Super-Colossal Blogosphere ‘Battle Of The Bands’ Voting Contest!

Here’s The Deal: By voting on the ‘Battle Of The Bands’ blog bits here and at the ‘FAR AWAY SERIES’ and ‘TOSSING IT OUT’ blogs, you can win the compact disc of your choice. Every 4 months, FarAwayEyes, Arlee Bird and I will add up how many times you voted on our blogs, and the person who has participated most often (i.e., submitted the most eligible votes) will get to select one compact disc that contains any one of the songs that were included in any of our ‘Battle Of The Bands’ installments (“Super-Colossal” expensive boxed-sets, imports, and ‘out-of-print’ compact discs not included). In the event of a tie, the names will be put in a Stetson and the name drawn from the cowboy hat will win the CD.

Rules For Voting: FAE, Arlee Bird and I post new ‘Battle Of The Bands’ blog bits on the 1st and 15th of each month. We also post our own personal votes for the respective blog bits on the 7th and 21st of each month (i.e., six days later). For your vote to be counted, it must be submitted in our comment sections BEFORE we post our own votes (BEFORE we make our own votes known on the 7th and the 21st).

Every 4 months there will be a new compact disc winner. In other words, ‘Battle Of The Bands’ #1 was posted on August 1, 2013, so at the end of November, one of you lucky voters is going to win a CD that includes one of the songs we’ve featured in our ‘Battle Of The Bands’ installments (you get to choose, and it doesn’t matter if the song won or lost its battle – if you like it, it’s YOURS!)

Alright, now... VOTE ON and ROCK ON! (while we 
‘Count On...’)

~ Stephen T. McCarthy

POSTSCRIPT: If you are a blogger participating in the BOTB posts but are not involved in the vote-counting for the compact disc prize, please be sure to mention your BOTB blog bit in my Comment Section, so that others (including li’l ol’ me) will know to visit your blog and cast a vote.

Links To Previous 'BOTB' Installments:

YE OLDE COMMENT POLICY: All comments, pro and con, are welcome. However, ad hominem attacks and disrespectful epithets will not be tolerated (read: "posted"). After all, this isn’t Amazon.com, so I don’t have to put up with that kind of bovine excrement. 
.

29 comments:

  1. I remember listening to the cast recording many times in our dining room since that was the only place we had an 8-track player and the copy I got from my mother was on 8-track cartridge. I now have it on CD and also have the DVD movie version.

    I'm going to have to go with the original cast recording by Lynn Kellogg though in some ways I prefer the instrumentation and production value of the other version. The movie version drags too much and has too much vocal acrobatics--something I'm usually no fan of.

    The original version is peppier and more rock sounding. It's the better of the two.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

    ReplyDelete
  2. Neither vocal is really in my wheelhouse... but the music was far superior on the second, so that's my vote.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'd like to see someone sneak Warhol's "Stephen J. McDaniels" into some fine arts museum, and take bets on how long it would stay on the wall before someone caught on.

    Broadway Lynn Kellogg's original makes me want to slip back into the comforts of my WABAC machine so that I can cruise around in my Chevy Corvair with the "Hair" 8-track blaring. Even so, the Hollywood Cheryl Barnes version gets my vote. It had some pleasant saxophone, and the bass gave my subwoofer something to do. In addition, her strong set of pipes shattered my Charles Emerson Winchester commemorative cognac glass to bits.

    Sigalmost2 close to call

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am voting for the Broadway version (Lynn Kellogg). I like the pace of it much better than the Hollywood version (Cheryl Barnes). The Barnes version was so slow during the first half that I nearly dozed off, and then when it picked up at the end she got all vibratto, which I really can't take. I hate it when people slide all over the note.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have to agree with what Arlee said about the Broadway version 'its peppier and more rock sounding' and that is only one of the reasons I'm voting for Cheryl Barnes and the MOVIE VERSION.

    I suppose a lot of people know these songs without ever having seen the movie, and probably even less have seen the theatrical production, but for me I can't separate the music from the story line. That is what makes Cheryl's slower, richer, deeper version more in line with the images this song conjures up for me. This is a broken heart sad, Sad, SAD love song and Cheryl helps me feel it(not to mention the images that run through my mind).

    ReplyDelete
  6. You stumped me, McDogg-I do not think I've ever heard either version (never saw Hair).

    I think I'm going with the cast version.

    LC

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lynn Kellogg gets my vote. I had the album as well, and knew most of the songs. She has a great strong voice which does the song justice.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks, ALL, for the votes and comments!

    Arlee Boid --- You got the 'HAIR' soundtrack from your Mother? How... progressive. (Then again, I got my LP from my parents, though I'm sure they weren't really aware of all the lyrical content - hashish, sexual perversion, et al.)

    CW --- When in doubt, vote the music!

    SigToo --- "...the bass gave my subwoofer something to do."
    I didn't know there was a character in 'HAIR' who was lower than Woof.

    "...shattered my Charles Emerson Winchester commemorative cognac glass to bits."
    Ha! Actually, it was David Ogden Stiers who shattered MY Charles Emerson Winchester commemorative cognac glasses to bits, when he caught my friends and me drinking Thunderbird out of them.

    Robin --- So, Cheryl was "slip, slidin' away; slip, slidin' awaaay", eh?

    FAE --- Your "second take" in my comment section was much better than you're first. I was SHOCKED to learn in Lee's BOTB blog bit comment section that you never owned the Broadway soundtrack to 'HAIR'. Wow! Hard to believe. I thought EVERYONE from our era owned it.

    DiscConnected --- You must have been hanging out with FAE's crowd in the late '60s, eh? You, the man of godzillian compact discs, never owned the 'HAIR' soundtrack, play or movie? Shirley you jest!

    D.G. --- Thanks for stopping by and putting in your .02 cents. I must say, I haven't totaled up the votes so far, but this thing is dang close! On the 21st, I'll add my vote and then we'll see who wins this battle.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

    ReplyDelete
  9. Actually my acquisition of the Hair 8-track was not as progressive as it might sound. My mother was a member of the Columbia Record Club (later she switched her preference to 8 tracks since they were so hip) and she usually didn't send in her card and just got whatever the featured album was. That's most likely how Hair fell into our possession. I'm sure she never listened to it or had much idea what it was. Since I'd read about it and some of the songs had already become hits, I was somewhat familiar with the musical. I wouldn't place the album on my most highly played list though.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. BOIDMAN ~
      For a couple of years, the Broadway soundtrack to 'HAIR' was certainly one of my most frequently played albums. (Of course I didn't own many albums at that time, either.)

      It's almost funny to see the words "8-tracks" and 'hip" in the same sentence!

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  10. You forget about that bootleg copy, I mentioned. Also, my parents were crazy, but not progressive at all. My daddy had zero tolerance for 'long hair' music that wasn't sung by Enrique Caruso. (His words not mine.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! Did Caruso sing much "long-hair" music?

      Oh, wait. Yes, he did. Before Neil Young came along, wasn't the group known as 'Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Caruso'?

      I liked their earlier, lesser known song 'Almost Grew My Hair'.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  11. I like both, but much to my surprise, I like the Hollywood version (which I'd never heard before) better.

    This summer, there was a hippy-dippy outdoor production of "Hair" about an hour away from us, but I wasn't able to convince my hubby he wanted to see it. (Darn it!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stubborn hubby! Doesn't even know what he wants when it's expressly told to him.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  12. Boy, this WAS a test! You are determined to drive a wedge into that musical divide. You've done a thorough job of it if you like EITHER of these harpies.

    I never owned "Hair." I was 13 when the musical came out, and there was NOTHING about any of the songs that appealed to me. You'll recall an earlier conversation about "Aquarius" in which I mentioned disliking the song.

    At that time I was still listening to rock (I was about 2 years from my 4-year-long "classical-only" phase), but the rock I liked was British invasion or Hendrix/Steppenwolf sorts of stuff(s).

    I loathed hippies (so why did I like Hendrix? Crazy, I guess), and so the whole concept of a musical about them was ridiculous to me. I'd attended dozens of traditional musicals and operas by then, and had no interest in Hair. NOT that my parents would have taken me. They'd have let me buy the album if I'd wanted it, but no way would I have spent money on that!

    The "not-quite-trained-vocalist-semi-musical-quality-but-singing-rock" voices of both of these women is like talons on a chalk board. Nothing worse than a mezzo-soprano with a slow vibrato.

    I abstain. If I heard either of these on the radio I'd break my finger trying to quickly punch any preset button... Even country-western.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SBB-6 ~
      Yes, I knew you didn't like 'Aquarius', and I was pretty sure you didn't like ANYTHING to do with 'HAIR' (hence my shout-out to you in the blog bit).

      But I DIDN'T know you'd dislike these so much that you'd actually abstain rather than vote the lesser of two efulls.

      Well, as Ed Wood said: "My next one will be better."

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  13. Cheryl Barnes is my vote...it is what I am familiar with. Also I felt more from her vocals than Lynn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LUMA13 ~
      Your voice has been heard.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  14. Sheboygan's comment made me truly LOL, and I don't use that acronym lightly.

    This wasn't my cup of tea either. Ultimately, it came down to which I disliked least. But I still disliked both of them pretty equally. So I consulted MacCATver for her perspective.

    After running an extensive algorithm into her mainframe, taking into account tempo, vocal range, and the juxtaposition of the moon to the axis of the earth, she concluded, "Meow." And since I don't speak Italian, I chose the first one with Lynn Kellogg.

    Oh, and since this party is now a proper "mullet," you don't mind if I hang out "back" here and have a beer, do you? Good. Speaking of which, I just recently tried another Polish beer. Okocim Pale Ale, and let me tell you... it's not as good as Beer Advocate ratings would lead me to believe. They put honey in it - a LOT, actually - and like every other Polish beer I've tried it's really, really sweet. I don't know what it is about those sweet-tooth Poles. The beer underneath that SEEMS to taste okay, but I can't properly tell because I keep getting sucker punched with sugar. Would not recommend.

    You try anything new lately?

    ReplyDelete
  15. BEER BOY, boy, am I disappointed in Sheboyganboy and you!

    I am not, however, disappointed in MacCATver. In the first place, "Meow", is not Italian. It's Chinese. And secondly, if you understood Chinese, you would have known that MacCATver voted for the same version of this song that I am going to vote for on the 21st.

    I have never had Okocim Pale Ale, but based on what you said here (honey, sweet), I'm sure I would not like it any more than you did.

    No, I've not tried anything really new lately. I did though go to The Main Ingredient last Sunday with Nappy and I had the Anderson Valley Brewing Company's 'Boont Amber Ale' on tap. I'd had this once before, bottled, and I will say that the flavor on tap seemed better than the bottled. But still not one I'd go out of my way for, considering how many I like even better.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

    ReplyDelete
  16. Part 1:

    STMcC's Vote On 'BOTB #4', And The Final Tally:

    Well, this is a first... We have a tie in the voting between Lynn Kellogg's version of the song 'EASY TO BE HARD' from the original Broadway soundtrack recording, and the version sung by Cheryl Barnes in the Hollywood movie adaptation of the play.

    Kellogg and Barnes each received 5 votes from my readers/commenters. BUT... I haven't cast MY vote yet!

    That's right, for the first time, my vote is going to break a tie and determine the winner.

    Before I reveal the winner I want to express (again) how surprised I was by the outcome. I really figured that this was going to be a landslide victory for the winner. Instead, it's going to be a squeaker, but a victory nonetheless, thanks to the final vote submitted by Yours Truly.

    I was also surprised by some of the apathy (putting it mildly in a couple cases) regarding this match-up; I really didn't see that coming. Shows ya what da god o' da blog knows.

    I said that I owned the Broadway soundtrack album to ‘HAIR’ back in “the day” and I played that LP bald! However, I’d not heard any of it for over 3 decades when I went to YouTube to get the versions for my BOTB #4 competition. When I heard Lynn Kellogg’s version of ‘Easy To Be Hard’, it was better than I had remembered.

    I agree with some of what Arlee Bird wrote: “The movie version drags [at least by comparison to the original] ... and has ... vocal acrobatics - something I'm usually no fan of. The original version is peppier and more rock sounding.”

    The original version also has a trace of that “chicken scratch” guitar style that I’ve said I’m always immediately attracted to.

    The movie version with Cheryl Barnes is sung slower, and utilizes some “vocal acrobatics”, as mentioned by Arlee. It’s somewhat in the style of, say, Whitney Houston. Like Lee, “I'm usually no fan of” of that type of singing, and Whitney Houston gets on my nerves. But...

    Continued Below...

    ReplyDelete
  17. Part 2:

    [You knew there’d be a “but”, didn’t you?] But... the key word in that sentence above is “usually”. Situations alter cases, and there’s an exception to most rules. ‘EASY TO BE HARD’ by Cheryl Barnes is that “exception”, that “situation”.

    I also agree with what FarAwayEyes wrote: “Cheryl's slower, richer, deeper version... This is a broken heart, sad, Sad, SAD love song and Cheryl helps me feel it”.

    That’s it, Peoples! ‘Easy To Be Hard’ is THE BLUES. It may not be presented in a traditional Blues format musically, but this song is The Blues, and Cheryl Barnes knocks it out of the arena. (I have even leaked a few tears at times, while watching the scene in ‘HAIR’ where ‘Easy To Be Hard’ is sung.) I think Cheryl’s version is intense and moving; she breaks my heart while singing about her broken heart.

    I’ve never seen a stage production of ‘HAIR’, and I’m no fan of hippies nor of most of what they endorsed and the lifestyle they lived (drug use, the Sexual Revolution, an aversion to soap), however, I am a BIG FAN of the movie version of ‘HAIR’! It includes some laugh-out-loud moments with some creative cinematography and choreography, a very interesting story, and an ending that won’t ever be forgotten by the viewer.

    ‘HAIR’ also has what I consider to be one of the most charismatic performances in silver screen history: Treat Williams as ‘George Berger’. In my opinion, Berger is, truly, one of the most complex and interesting characters ever portrayed on stage or screen. (Someday I may attempt to write an extensive analysis on what makes the George Berger character so compelling to me.)

    When I think of the most charismatic performances of the silver screen, the ones that first leap immediately to my mind are James Dean in ‘East Of Eden’, Robert De Niro in ‘The Deer Hunter’, Val Kilmer in ‘Tombstone’, and Treat Williams in ‘Hair’.

    It just so happens that the ‘Easy To Be Hard’ scene is my favorite in the entire movie (and just one in which George Berger betrays his narcissistic hippie credentials). When looking for music videos for my BOTB installments, I always seek those with no moving images so as to keep the focus solely on the music and not to distract or influence you with pretty, moving pictures.

    In this case, I almost hated to use a single-image video because the actual movie scene only enhances the powerful emotion of Cheryl Barnes’ performance. For those interested in seeing what’s happening on the “silver screen” while ‘Easy To Be Hard’ is sung, I will include a YouTube video link below.

    Due to picture size and diminished image quality, it might not be clear what is happening in the background, so I’ll tell you that George Berger is doing everything he can to urge Lafayette to go back to his girl and make peace. And that’s the whole Berger dichotomy right there: George “Us Versus Them” Berger the... peacemaker? The uniter?

    Here’s the scene and the song again, if you’re interested:

    EASY TO BE HARD – ‘HAIR’ The Movie Musical

    Final Score:
    Broadway ‘Hair’ w/ Lynn Kellogg = 5 votes
    Hollywood ‘Hair’ w/ Cheryl Barnes = 6 votes

    My thanks again to everyone who read and commented.

    See ya again on October 7th.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    ‘Loyal American Underground’

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OOPS!
      I meant October 1st!

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
    2. I’m back AGAIN!
      Can you believe it uh?

      I forgotted to mention a few things...

      I wanted to say that I would put Cheryl Barnes’ version of ‘Easy To Be Hard’ on my list of all time ‘Top Ten Favorite Vocal Performances’. (So THERE!)

      I also intended to say that even in an intense scene like the one for ‘Easy To Be Hard’ in the movie ‘Hair’, there is humor to be found. I mean... when the self-absorbed, pretentious Lafayette says, “Do you understand about cosmic consciousness and all that kinda shit? Because that’s what I’m talkin’ about, baby!” if that doesn’t strike you as ironically funny... all I can say is, “What tribe you with, baby?”

      Last thing... For anyone interested, my full-length review of the movie ‘HAIR’ can be found here: “THOSE ARE HIPPIES, STEPHEN.”

      OK, now I’m finished. Seriously.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      ‘Loyal American Underground’

      Delete
  18. I guess I'm going to have to watch that movie again. I don't remember it making much of an impact on me. I watched it 2 years ago I think it was.

    This 1st and 15th thing is taxing me somewhat. I've got to decide whether or not I want to do mine on Monday the 30th when I usually get more traffic or Oct 2nd on which I do Alex's IWSG posting and get more traffic. I'm afraid a post on Tuesday might get lost. Maybe I'll make an event of it like I did with the last post and do a lead up post on Monday and a follow-up post on Wednesday drawing all attention to my Tuesday BOTB post.

    Hmmm--I'm thinking, I'm thinking.

    Lee
    Wrote By Rote

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's all good with me, LEE.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  19. That was a close one. Glad to see that I ended up on the winning side here (that did not happen in my own contest).

    It's my opinion that everything about the Broadway version was a lot more flippant vs. emotional, at least as far as the songs went.

    ReplyDelete
  20. So, did you create the "Andy Warhol Mardi Gras Girl" also? I cannot find it as a real bit of art. You did a good job on the picture of you drinking!

    ReplyDelete
  21. FAE --- Having never seen the stage production, I have no idea how that song was incorporated into the play's story. I was actually surprised to learn from you that the play's ending was basically the same as the movie's ending. (I had always assumed that Hollywood came up with a new, better ending for 'Hair'-the-movie. Why? I guess I figured a bunch of hippies producing a play in New York weren't clever enough to imagine a twist like that.)

    If 'Easy To Be Hard' was used in the play in a similar situation story-wise to the movie, then the song was definitely WAY TOO CASUAL! It should have sounded like a heartrending piece of music - not a light, rhythmic Rock number. As stand-alone musical pieces, it makes no real difference how the musicians choose to present it; but if it was meant, in the play, to express her viewpoint after such mistreatment from Lafayette, then it was badly arranged.

    SHEBOYGANBOY 6 --- Ha! Thanks! (Only you would begin researching it. I love that 'bout cha.) Yes, the Andy Warhol 'Mardi Gras Girl' was also a fake.

    I really didn't do anything but find a website that allows you to load photos, choose an art style, and then the computer rearranges them. I used the 'Andy Warhol' style for those photos. Every time you click the "make art" button (or however it's labeled), the system gives you the same photo in a slightly different look (i.e., different color combinations in the four different squares).

    I made and copied about 3 or 4 of each of those photos and then when it came time to post, I selected the one of each I liked best, according to the colors. I chose that particular version of 'Stephen J. McDaniels' primarily because I liked the upper right photo with the blue, black and grey color combination.

    If you want, I can post a link to that photo/art site for ya.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

    ReplyDelete

NOTE: Comment Moderation is activated. All submitted comments that do not transgress "Ye Olde Comment Policy" will be posted and responded to as soon as possible. Thanks for taking the time to comment.